Six

Our image of Christ in the manger can often be trivialised because of the commercial cut-in on what should be a time of sacred reflection in the Holy calendar. At the time of Christ’s birth, man had no foreknowledge that the events which took place would be recorded, or that the story would become part of a book we now have called the Bible. There was no way of knowing that (a proposed) 525 years after His incarnation, the Anno Domini dating system would be created, and popularised in the 8th century. There were no common carols sung at the birth of Christ, Santa Clause was not present, there were no trees being put up, in fact there were no traditions in place at all. ‘Christmas’ itself was not introduced until the early Christians wanted to gather when the pagans celebrated the winter solstice, calling it ‘Christes maesse’ meaning ‘Christ’s mass,’ or ‘festival of Christ’. What does any of this have to do with love? The answer is, everything. History now revolves around the most poignant display of love known to mankind. The conception of Christ, His birth, His life, His death, and His resurrection, are all signposts which guide us through the remarkable design of God’s great rescue of His creation. Love in this instance; that is, in the instance of the incarnation, is the Great Rescue of Humanity. This is why we call Him our Saviour. “because there was born to you this day a Saviour—who is Christ the Lord—in the City of David.”

BEHOLD THE LAMB OF GOD HAS COME
BEHOLD THE SAVIOUR IS BORN
SING OF HIS LOVE

It is more than worth our contemplation, that the God of all creation, the King of Light, descended
into a dark world, presenting Himself in the most vulnerable and humble state possible; as a baby.
Only He foreknew the things He would endure. And yet, because of His Great Love, He came.